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Education


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R. Foster Winans and Inside Trading

R. Foster Winans was a well-known journalist in the 1980s. He wrote the influential “Heard on the Street” column for the Wall Street Journal. As the story goes, Winans leaked inside information from his reporting to a stockbroker at Kidder Peabody. The broker, Peter Brant, in turn, placed trades on the behalf of Winans and both parties were enriched as a result of having the trades executed before an article was published and available for the general public.


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Albert H. Wiggin and Chase Bank

Albert H. Wiggin became the face of what would become known as insider trading. The reality is that prior to Wiggin’s actions, insider trading was largely ignored by the U.S. government. But that all changed with the 1933 Securities Act that is known by its nickname, the “Wiggin Act.” The Wiggin Provision of the 1933 Securities Act prevents company directors from short selling their own stocks and profiting from their company’s misfortune.


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Martha Stewart and ImClone Systems

Martha Stewart was charged with insider trading of ImClone Systems. Ultimately the charges of securities fraud were thrown out. However, Stewart was still found guilty on four counts of obstruction of justice and lying to investigators. Ms. Steward served five months at the Alderson Federal Prison Camp in West Virginia. After completing that sentence, she served five months of house arrest and two years of probation.


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Phil Mickleson and Dean Foods

Like other inside trading allegations, the case surrounding Mickleson goes to show how difficult it can be to prove an act of insider trading. Although Mickleson was not convicted of insider trading, the case serves as a cautionary tale. In this case, the question of insider trading centers around a tip Mickleson received about Dean Foods.


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Insider Ownership: How to Track Changes in Ownership from Insiders and Officers

Investors or traders who buy or sell stock can research who the insider owners of a company are and follow their trading behavior, piggybacking off their trades to make stock market decisions with a positive financial outcome.


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SEC Forms: Understanding Insider Trading Reports

Let’s take a look at each and every document and disclosure that the SEC is looking at when a registrant files with the SEC in accordance with the Securities Act.


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How to Track Insider Trading

Insider trading, when accompanied by an insider filling out the requisite forms and following the rules outlined by the SEC, is perfectly legal. Moreover, it’s a great way for investors to get insights about market movements, sometimes even before the market moves. Tracking legal insider trading through the SEC website or signing up to get a daily update from a InsiderTrades.com is a perfectly legal stock trading strategy, and it’s an investing tactic we encourage you to use often.


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What is Insider Trading?

Insider trading occurs when someone with insider knowledge acts on that knowledge to buy or sell large quantities of a stock. It’s important to keep in mind that some forms of insider trading are legal. When corporate insiders of the company issuing stock buy and sell those stocks, that is perfectly acceptable. The only requirement to legitimize these trades is that certain forms must be filled out with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) within two days of the transaction. According to the SEC, in these instances, anyone with 10 percent stake or more in a company is considered an insider.

A Powerful Day Trading Strategy that can produce $300 - $500 in just 15 Minutes
Reserve your free virtual seat to an exclusive trading session with legendary trader Tyson Clayton
Claim Your Seat Here
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